You probably already know the importance of first impressions. Well, they’re even more crucial when you’re searching for a job. Introducing yourself properly lays the groundwork for a professional conversation, and this dialog can take place almost anywhere – at a networking event, with an associate or at the start of an interview.

One tool that many people practice and perfect for these occasions is the elevator pitch. These simple, but effective, introductions can begin your short journey to a new job.

Here is what you need to know:

What is an elevator pitch?

An elevator pitch is your mini-biography.  It’s called an “elevator pitch” because you should be able to deliver it in the time it takes to ride an elevator from the bottom floor to the top of a building (about 30 seconds or 75 words). Elevator pitches are also related to selling a product or promoting an idea, but in this case, you are the product and the idea.

Where do you use them? 

First and foremost, an elevator pitch is the perfect start for an interview. When the interviewer says, “Tell me about yourself,” you will be prepared to answer concisely and confidently without awkward hesitations filled with “um” and “ah.”

Another ideal use of the elevator pitch is to introduce yourself in everyday situations, which could include a party, a networking event or maybe even in line at the grocery store.

How do you create an elevator pitch?

Your elevator pitch should answer these three questions:

  1. Who are you? Introduce yourself with a smile, a handshake, and a pleasantry like “Pleased to meet you.”
  2. What do you do? Give the most pertinent information such as your education, work experience, and any of your specialties and strengths.
  3. What do you want? This part is critical if you want to be considered for a job opportunity. You’ll want to explain the value you will bring and why you’re a good fit for the position.

Here’s how it might sound:

“Hi, my name is John Smith. It’s so nice to meet you! I’m a production supervisor at XYZ Manufacturing, overseeing all aspects of machining and fabrication. Along with my twelve years of professional experience, I recently received certification in CNC programming, which helps me to direct and schedule work through the plant. I believe I’m the perfect fit for both the work you perform and for your company’s culture.”

Ending your elevator pitch

Depending on the situation, you could end by asking permission to call in a few days to discuss future opportunities. Be sure to thank the person for their time, and let them know you will be following up with an email.

Delivering your pitch

  • Don’t rush through it
  • Keep it conversational
  • Stay away from catch phrases and acronyms
  • Show your confidence

Do you need more help in securing your next job?

We’re here for you. Contact Pro Resources for the light industrial or technical/professional position you’re hoping to find. We’ve been in business for over 30 years, so let us use our expertise to help you find your next job.