It should come as no surprise that those candidates who show some enthusiasm and passion during an interview will typically create a favorable impression. After all, no hiring manager wants to add a wet blanket to the team, even if that individual has the required skills and experience. 

But even though it’s a good idea to show your enthusiasm to the recruiter, imust be displayed correctly, or it might end up working against you. In other words, you want to sound and look passionate about your career without coming across as if you are desperate or overdosed on caffeine. 

Here are a few tips to consider and some things to avoid so you can show the ideal amount of enthusiasm: 

You want to come across as confident instead of desperate.

Desperate candidates will tell hiring managers what they think thewant to hear. Their over-the-top behavior could cause an interviewer to question their sincerity. Conversely, confident candidates have an enthusiastic giveandtake with the interviewer. They show plenty of interest in the job without resorting to the over-eagerness that sounds and looks like desperation.  

Confidence is not the same as arrogance.

Occasionallyconfidence and enthusiasm cross the line into cockiness. While it’s acceptable to talk about your accomplishments and the skills you have developed, passing yourself off as an “expert,” especially if you’re still a young adult, will not make the desired impression on an experienced hiring manager. They might come away with the opinion that you’ll say anything to get hired. 

Focus on how you will help your new company.

Ask not what a future employer can do for you; ask what you can do for your prospective employer. Yes, that’s a paraphrase of President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural address from 1960, but it serves to make a good point: keep your focus and excitement on the primary reasons you want to work for this company. And make sure it’s because your talents can help them achieve their mission and not because they have amazing perks. 

Do your research.

Show your enthusiasm by walking into your interview after you have learned about the company, its industry, the competition, and the challenges that you could face in your new role. Your hiring manager will understand that you are passionate because you took the time and put effort into preparing for the interview.   

Know when to be quiet.

While it’s okay to let the interviewer know that you’re impressed by the company and would love to work there, don’t ramble on for five or ten minutes explaining it. You don’t want to become an effusive bore. Be respectful of the interviewer’s time, and stay on point. 

Would you like more tips on a successful job interview?

We can help you. Contact Pro Resources for the light industrial or technical/professional position you’re hoping to find. We’ve been in business for over 30 years, so use our expertise to help you make the best impression at your next interview.