Anyone who interviews candidates for their company’s job openings will tell you the same thing; it can be challenging. You’re trying to find the person who is capable of performing the tasks required for the position, but you’re also looking for someone who will fit into your company’s culture and work well with others.

That’s difficult enough, even if you get to know the real person during the interview. Unfortunately, the person you see in the interview isn’t always the same one who shows up for work. Many candidates are good at telling interviewers what they want to hear. They know which questions are typically asked, and they are prepared with well-crafted answers. They leave the interview having said all the right things without revealing much about themselves.

You need to ask those traditional questions.

As an interviewer, you may be tired of hearing the same answers to questions about the person’s skills and experience. But those questions are the basis on which you determine if the candidate meets the practical requirements of the job. During this phase of the interview, you can also give them a scenario or problem, and ask how they would handle it.

You also want to know that they have taken the time to do their homework about your company. If they have come to the interview with scant knowledge of the company, the industry, your competitors and customers, you won’t have to move on to the non-traditional questions…that one’s a dud!

If, however, this person possesses the skills, experience and background knowledge you’re looking for, and combines them with a positive attitude and likable personality, you’ll want to take a closer look to make sure your first impressions are accurate.

Surprise your candidates with some non-traditional questions. Don’t stray too far. The questions should have a relationship to the job, and it’s important to stay legal. But using these non-traditional interview questions in conjunction with traditional questions will allow you to get a more comprehensive impression of your candidate.

Try these three on for size:

  1. What role do you like best when you’re working on a team?

Here, you’ll find out which roles on the team your candidate finds comfortable. Every role is important, but if you find the candidate is only interested in leading, and that’s not what you need at this time, you might not have the right candidate.

  1. Do you like being noticed when you walk into a room, or would you rather not stand out?

This question helps you find out if the candidate is an introvert or extrovert. Either one can be desirable, depending on the position.

  1. What are you known for?

Your candidates get an opportunity to tell you about their personal brand, and this could indicate how they will represent yours.

Are you looking for great employees?

Let us help you find them. Contact Pro Resources for the light industrial or technical/professional help you need. We’ve been in business for over 30 years, so we will use our expertise to help you find your next top-notch worker.